How to Cast Using A Centerpin Reel

Side Cast, Centerpin Fishing, Float Fishing

The first challenge that new centerpin fisherman often face is casting.  The two most common techniques that most anglers use are the Side Cast and the Wallis Cast.  Whatever technique you decide to use, the most important part of casting with a float reel is allowing the line to pass freely through your open hand (free hand).

The Side Cast is probably the easier of the two techniques to master quickly.  The Side Cast generates a good deal of distance however it also causes line twist – you know, when your line gets tangled and you’re cursing up a storm – which means you’ll have to replace it that much sooner.

Step 1: With your free hand palm facing up (left hand pictured above), pull 12 – 24” of line away from your float reel, while preventing the line from falling off the face of your reel with your rod hand (right hand pictured above).

Step 2: When you’re ready cast your line, your rod hand (right hand pictured above) should let go of the line and your free hand (left hand pictured above) should allow line to pass freely through your fingers.  The key here is to maintain an L-shape between your free hand (left hand pictured above), your float reel and your rod throughout the cast.

The Wallis Cast, Centerpin Fishing, Float Fishing

The Wallis Cast is definitely trickier to pull off but it has its advantages, for instance, it produces less line twist and generates good distance.  One of the major drawbacks of this technique is the likelihood of overrun – which means you’re left with a bunch of excess line hanging and looping around your reel – definitely not cool.  What makes this technique so difficult to master is the timing, which has to be just right.  One of the reasons anglers like this technique is you can generate a good deal of distance without much of a windup, which is ideal when fishing close quarters.

Step 1: With your free hand (left hand pictured above) pull down on your line, allowing line to roll off your float reel, while simultaneously casting your float to your desired target with your rod hand (right hand pictured above).

Step 2: Using your free hand (left hand pictured above), guide the line beneath your reel back to the spool while gradually applying the brakes to your float reel with your rod hand (right hand pictured above) in order to prevent overrun.

There’s also a third technique that some float fishermen use.  The idea is essentially to combine the Side Cast and the Wallis Cast to produce an awesome hybrid cast, the all powerful Spinning Side Cast – WHAT!  The advantages are two-fold: less line twist and even greater distances.

Step 1: Pull down with your free hand (left hand pictured above), allowing line to roll off your float reel, while simultaneously casting your float to your desired target with your rod hand (right hand pictured above)

Step 2: Quickly form an L-shape between your free hand (left hand pictured above), your float reel and your rod throughout the cast. Recall that your rod hand (right hand pictured above) should let go of the line and your free hand (left hand pictured above) should allow line to pass freely through your fingers.

Step 3: Gradually apply the brakes to your float reel with your rod hand (right hand pictured above) in order to prevent overrun.

Timing is everything with the last two casting techniques and can produce some beauty tangles if not done just right.  For centerpin fishing newbs, the Side Cast is absolutely the way to go.  It’s fairly versatile and easy to learn in a short span of time.

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